Radiometric dating clocks

Over hundreds to thousands of millions of years, continents, oceans and mountain ranges have moved vast distances both vertically and horizontally.

For example, areas that were once deep oceans hundreds of millions of years ago are now mountainous desert regions.

The basic equation of radiometric dating requires that neither the parent nuclide nor the daughter product can enter or leave the material after its formation.

The possible confounding effects of contamination of parent and daughter isotopes have to be considered, as do the effects of any loss or gain of such isotopes since the sample was created.

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However, a more powerful tool was the fossilised remains of ancient animals and plants within the rock strata.

Accurate radiometric dating generally requires that the parent has a long enough half-life that it will be present in significant amounts at the time of measurement (except as described below under "Dating with short-lived extinct radionuclides"), the half-life of the parent is accurately known, and enough of the daughter product is produced to be accurately measured and distinguished from the initial amount of the daughter present in the material.

The procedures used to isolate and analyze the parent and daughter nuclides must be precise and accurate.

This normally involves isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

The precision of a dating method depends in part on the half-life of the radioactive isotope involved.

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