Dating marshall amps serial number

Oddlings – Yet another printing error has surfaced, this time from the FEI (pre-CBS) days.

Besides, no article in the Dating Fender Amps by Serial Number series would be complete without some interesting information, n’est ce pas?

How to read the serial number (1969-1983) Marshall used a coding system that provided (a) model, (b) serial number, and (c) manufacture date.

This (a)(b)(c) sequence began in 1969 and was valid through 1983.

It’s unknown if the tweed covering was a mistake (“Oops, I thought this was a 4x10 Bassman cabinet that I was covering”) or intentional, perhaps as a special order.

Non-Schumacher transformers – It’s been universally accepted that Fender only used Schumacher transformers on amps made in the 1960s and 1970s.

Since A was used in both 19, Marshall decided that 1971 would start with C.

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Working at FMI – I was able to interview a fellow (who wishes to remain anonymous) who worked at Fender in 1972-73 in the amp department.Of course I tended to hurry more when they were there, and I would fumble more, too.” Another really interesting fact was that he recalled that the eyelet boards were loaded/wired/soldered in Mexico!“I remember the circuit boards were pre-made, from Mexico, easy to screw into the chassis. When we had filled our cart we'd wheel it over to the Chicano chicks.A 1957 tweed Vibrolux was reported with a tube chart printed with circuit “5E3” (tweed Deluxe) instead of the correct 5F11 (see photo).Clearly Fender wasn’t afraid to use incorrect parts when they were in a bind. The 5G12 Concert is the earliest version from very late 1959 and early 1960 so the existence of a tweed example, while extremely rare, is certainly plausible since Fender was making lots of tweed amps during the same time period.

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